Health Library

Showing 1 - 10 of 4974

  • Page of 498
  • Next >

  • Feeding Your Premature Infant

    If your premature infant was born before the gestational age of 32 to 34 weeks, he or she cannot feed by mouth. This is because of: Poor coordination (or lack) of sucking, swallowing, and gag reflex. Weakness of both the oral and stomach muscles. Small stomach capacity. Until your infant...

  • NICU: Communicating With the Staff

    The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) staff are vital not only to your infant's health but also to your understanding of your infant's condition. When you are with your infant's doctor or nurse, ask whatever questions you have about your infant's health and care. The NICU staff understands that this...

  • Immunizations for Premature Infants

    Starting at 2 months after birth, premature infants (preemies) need all the recommended immunizations that full-term infants get. The one vaccine that your preemie may not get on schedule is the hepatitis B vaccine. In full-term infants, it is usually given at birth. But this vaccine doesn't work as well...

  • Avoiding Mercury in Fish

    What is mercury? Mercury is a metal found naturally in the environment. Human activities, such as farming, burning coal, and using mercury in manufacturing, increase the mercury cycling through the air, water, and soil. In water, mercury changes its form and becomes methylmercury. Fish absorb this mercury. When you...

  • First-Trimester Exams and Tests

    At each prenatal visit during your first trimester, you'll be weighed and have your blood pressure checked. Your urine may also be checked for bacteria, protein, or sugar. As early as weeks 10 to 12, you may be able to hear your baby's heartbeat using a Doppler ultrasound. By the...

  • Second-Trimester Exams and Tests

    At each prenatal visit in the second trimester, you'll be weighed and your blood pressure will be checked. Your urine may be checked for bacteria, protein, or sugar. Your doctor or midwife will listen to your baby's heartbeat and measure the size of your uterus (fundal height) to track your...

  • Third-Trimester Exams and Tests

    At each prenatal visit in the third trimester, you'll be weighed, and your blood pressure and urine will be checked. Your doctor or midwife will measure the size of your uterus (fundal height) and feel your belly. This is done to check your baby's growth and position. Late in the...

  • Pregnancy: Prenatal Visit Schedule

    As your pregnancy moves along, your prenatal visits will happen more often. So you'll have the chance to get to know your doctor or midwife well. It's common to see your doctor or midwife: Every 4 weeks until week 28. Every 2 to 3 weeks from weeks 28 to 36.

  • Pregnancy: Choosing a Health Professional

    It's important to find a doctor or midwife who can work closely with you and share in decision making. This partnership is key to getting the care that is best for you. And it will help you have the pregnancy and childbirth that you want. Options for your care Several...

  • Baby Blues

    Many women get postpartum blues, also called the "baby blues," during the first few days after childbirth. They may lose sleep, feel irritable, cry easily, and feel happy one minute and sad the next. Hormone changes are one cause of these emotional changes. Also, the demands of a new baby,...


Showing 1 - 10 of 4974

  • Page of 498
  • Next >